Deviled Egg Recipe

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A good recipe for Deviled Eggs is one of those essential things you’ll want in your arsenal for potlucks, holidays, parties, and other gatherings. We’re keeping things simple with minimal ingredients and plenty of fresh herbs to give you a creamy and flavorful deviled egg filling! 

For us, deviled eggs are a “must-have” on the table for Easter alongside Grape Salad, homemade Dinner Rolls, and these perfect Mashed Potatoes

Photo of a platter of Deviled Eggs.

What are Deviled Eggs?

Deviled Eggs (also known as stuffed eggs, dressed eggs, angel eggs, or Russian eggs) are hard-boiled eggs that have had the shells removed, been cut in half, and then filled with a mixture of egg yolk mashed together with other ingredients. But, where does the word “deviled” come in? I’ve always wondered when making and eating these eggs, what exactly makes a food deviled?

It turns out there’s a very simple explanation (thanks Wikipedia): the term “deviled” (referring to food) was used in the 19th century to refer to spicy or zesty food including eggs prepared with mustard, pepper, or other ingredients stuffed in the yolk cavity. 

Deviled Eggs are usually served cold as an appetizer or side dish but can even be part of a main course. They usually show up for holidays, parties, or potlucks and are especially popular at Easter time! 

So, history lesson: check. Let’s talk step-by-step for this deviled egg recipe, with all my best tips!

How to make Deviled Eggs

Image of the shell being removed on one of the cooked eggs for this Deviled Eggs recipe.

Step One: Hard boil the eggs.

  • Place the eggs in a large pan and cover them with two inches of cold water. Use a wide saucepan so the eggs can fit in a single layer.
  • When the water boils, boil for 1 minute, remove the pan from heat, and cover for 17 minutes. The passive heat will cook the eggs.
  • Transfer to an ice bath.
  • Run eggs under cold water while peeling.

Have a hard time with hard boiling eggs? Here are some tips:

  • Avoid farm-fresh eggs — OLDER eggs (10+ days old) will always peel easier.
    • How do you know how old an egg is? Fill a bowl with cold water and put your eggs in the bowl. Fresh/new eggs sink to the bottom and lay flat on their sides. Few weeks old (perfect for hard-boiled) eggs stand on one end at the bottom of the bowl. If the eggs float to the surface of the water, they’re no longer good to use.
  • Wait until the eggs have cooled to room temperature before peeling. (However, note that refrigerated hard-boiled eggs will not peel as easily.)
    • If you’re still having trouble, crack (but don’t peel) the cooled egg and place it back into an ice bath. The water will get under the shell (where you cracked it) and become easier to peel after about 5 minutes.

Image of several of the cooked eggs cut open, with their cooked yolks still in them.

Step Two: Halve hard-boiled eggs, remove the yolks, and prepare the filling.

  • Now that you have perfect hard-boiled eggs shelled, pop out the yolks and if necessary, clean up the whites a bit by wiping them with a damp cloth.
  • To get the yolks super-smooth and creamy (lump-free!) you can do one of two things:
    • Press the yolks through a medium-mesh sieve (more time consuming). 
    • Beat the yolks with a hand mixer until smooth and fluffy (less time consuming).
  • Add in all of the other ingredients: mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, fresh herbs, and some seasonings.

Image of all the ingredients that go into the Deviled Egg filling.

Step Three: Mix the filling ingredients and transfer to a piping bag.

  • Stir everything together to get a smooth filling.
  • Transfer the filling to a bag fitted with a piping tip (such as a star tip).
    • Tip: drop the piping bag into a tall glass and fold the opening of the bag down around the glass. Now you can scoop in the egg filling without having to balance a bag and spoon!
    • See step-by-step photos on how to fill a piping bag here.
  • Don’t want to use a piping tip?
    • Use a small cookie scoop or even a regular spoon to scoop the filling into the egg whites.
    • Cut the corner off a resealable plastic bag, fill it with yolk filling, and then “pipe” it into the egg white halves.

Image of the creamy Deviled Egg filling all mixed together in a bowl.

Step Four: Pipe filling into the eggs.

  • Pipe the filling right into the egg whites.
  • Garnish with fresh herbs and a sprinkle of paprika right before serving.
  • See below for other fun variations on Deviled Eggs.

Image of the filling being pipped into the eggs making the best Deviled Eggs.

Now that we’ve discussed the ins and outs of making Deviled Eggs, let’s talk about how to jazz them up. There are a million and one ways to make a Deviled Egg, and today I’m sharing our idea of the perfect standard version. Feel free to use any of the ideas below for a more jazzed-up version and please share your egg variation ideas in the comment box below! 

Deviled Egg recipe variations

  • If you hate mayonnaise, I’ve heard that melted butter works in its place (I have never personally tried this). 
  • Deviled eggs with bacon: Follow my recipe and add cooked and crumbled bacon right on top!
  • Other great variations/toppings: Chopped parsley, chopped chives, capers, pimientos, sliced olive, cooked & crumbled sausage, jalapeños, Sriracha sauce, pickled onions, crabmeat, and many more ideas here all add a new dimension to Deviled Eggs.
  • Everything bagel seasoning: Add this famous seasoning blend sprinkled on top!

QUICK TIP

For a different twist on Deviled Eggs, swap out the mayo for an equal amount of mashed avocado. The acid in the Dijon mustard will help keep the avocado from browning.

Deviled Egg tips

  • Center egg yolks: A few days before making your deviled eggs, rotate the eggs in the carton to be upside down (tip pointed down in the carton).
  • Keep deviled eggs from sliding: If you’ll be transporting these deviled eggs, place them in a mini muffin tin, loosely covered with plastic wrap. Here are some other transport ideas.
  • Boil a few extra eggs: If you need a certain amount of eggs, boil a couple of extra, just in case any eggs don’t peel or end up nice.

Image of the Deviled Eggs on a platter.

Other easy appetizers to serve 

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Deviled Egg Recipe

5 from 3 votes
A good recipe for Deviled Eggs is one of those essential things you'll want in your arsenal for potlucks, holidays, parties, and other gatherings. We're keeping things simple with minimal ingredients and plenty of fresh herbs to give you a creamy and flavorful deviled egg filling! 
Print Recipe

Deviled Egg Recipe

5 from 3 votes
A good recipe for Deviled Eggs is one of those essential things you'll want in your arsenal for potlucks, holidays, parties, and other gatherings. We're keeping things simple with minimal ingredients and plenty of fresh herbs to give you a creamy and flavorful deviled egg filling! 
Course Appetizer
Cuisine American, Vegetarian
Keyword deviled egg recipe, deviled eggs
Prep Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 24 deviled eggs
Calories 57kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 dozen large eggs Note 1
  • 1 tablespoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons mayonnasie
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper (reduce if not using kosher salt)
  • 1/4 teaspoon white sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons (+ more for garnish) finely chopped herbs (I like to use a combination of chives, flat-leaf Italian parsley, and dill)
  • Paprika to sprinkle on top

Instructions

  • Place raw eggs in a large, wide saucepan and cover with at least 2 inches of cold water. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Add in 1 tablespoon salt and boil for exactly 1 minute. Cover pan, remove from heat, and let stand for 17 minutes. Remove the eggs from the pan and submerge in an ice bath. Let cool for 5 minutes. Gently crack the eggshells (make sure the majority of the shell is cracked) and gently begin removing the shells. If shells aren't coming off easily, crack and return to ice water. As needed, dunk eggs in and out of the water to remove any shell slivers. You can also peel them under running cold water.
  • Slice the eggs in half lengthwise and remove the yolks. Place yolks in a medium-sized bowl. Either press the yolks through a medium-sized sieve or beat until smooth using a hand mixer. Add in the remaining ingredients: mayo, apple cider vinegar, Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper (add salt and pepper to taste), sugar, cayenne pepper, and 2 tablespoons of finely chopped herbs. Taste the filling and adjust seasoning to personal preference.
  • Arrange the whites on a large serving platter and gently wipe them clean if needed. 
  • Fit a piping bag with an open star tip. Drop the piping bag into a tall glass and fold the opening of the bag down around the glass. Scoop in the egg filling. (If you don't want to use a tip/piping bag, you can snip the top off a plastic bag, or spoon the filling in with a spoon or use a small cookie dough scoop.) Pipe the yolk mixture evenly into the egg white halves. (Fill eggs as close to serving time as possible).
  • Right before serving, sprinkle eggs evenly with paprika and additional finely chopped herbs.

Recipe Notes

Note 1: I always boil an extra 2 eggs in case some don't turn out well. Make sure eggs are at least 10 days old; the older they are, the easier they'll peel. Use the guide in the post to make sure the eggs are old enough, but not so old that they are spoiled.

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 57kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 83mg | Sodium: 351mg | Potassium: 30mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 126IU | Calcium: 12mg | Iron: 1mg

We do our best to provide accurate nutritional analysis for our recipes. Our nutritional data is calculated using a third-party algorithm and may vary, based on individual cooking styles, measurements, and ingredient sizes. Please use this information for comparison purposes and consult a health professional for nutrition guidance as needed.

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Recipe Rating




6 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I loved these deviled eggs absolutely delicious. Thank you for all of the wonderful tips they were so helpful in getting the perfect result.

  2. 5 stars
    No idea the older the egg the better they peel! Such a great tip for making these come out perfect every time!

  3. 5 stars
    These were easy to make and tasted so fresh and delicious. Thanks for the peeling tip too! I never knew that before.

  4. I am about to make this delicious sounding recipe, I am wondering about the one tablespoon of fine sea salt, is that correct? Thank you!

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